Lower School Curriculum

First Grade

Language Arts

Stratford’s language arts curriculum is comprised of reading, language, writing, and spelling. Reading instruction includes a balanced, developmentally appropriate approach to teaching phonemic awareness, phonics, and comprehension. Students are exposed to variety of methods and materials to teach and motivate each student. Students are taught to appreciate literature and encouraged to develop a love for reading. Every day students are read to, they are read with, or they read silently.

First grade is introduced to authentic literature. Reading and writing activates focus on comprehension, vocabulary, and exploring ideas and concepts. Literature is organized around issue and subject themes. In first grade there is an emphasis on phonemic awareness, phonics instruction, word knowledge, and fluency. Each skill is systematically taught in a logical progression to enable understanding and mastery. Students are introduced to comprehension skills such as locating key information, inferencing, comparing and contrasting, sequencing, predicting outcomes, context clues, and figurative language.

First grade is also introduced to communication skills such as spelling, vocabulary, and the writing process. They learn to write basic sentences, and then begin to formulate paragraphs. Grammar, speaking, listening and mechanics are incorporated into the language arts program. The students study punctuation, plurals and possessives, contractions, and parts of speech.

Literature and Literacy Skills:
  • Identify title and author
  • Recognize setting
  • Identify characters and their characteristics
  • Visualization
  • Distinguish between reality and fantasy
  • Relate story to personal experience
Comprehension Skills:
  • Restate the main idea
  • Sequence of events
  • Cause and effect relationships
  • Predict outcomes
  • Draw conclusions based on given information and familiar experiences
  • Recognize various genres
Math
Math lessons are designed to incorporate multisensory teaching methods. The math program introduces new concepts at incremental stages of development. Students have continued practice and review of the concepts on a daily basis. Students use manipulatives and are exposed to a variety of learning techniques. They also develop a solid foundation in the language and definitions of math. A daily math board is used to practice mental math, word problems, patterns, geometry, and problems on time, money, and computation.

The following skills are introduced and practiced in the first grade. Many of the skills are not mastered. Other concepts and skills are presented for enrichment.

Math Skills:
  • Skip count by 1’s, 2’s, 5’s, 10’s
  • Identify a fractional part
  • Compare and order numbers
  • Identify place value to 100
  • Identify ordinal position to tenth
  • Identify a sorting rule
  • Identify and extend patterns
  • Solve word problems
  • Master all basic addition facts
  • Master most of the basic subtraction facts
  • Add and subtract two-digit numbers without regrouping
  • Use comparison symbols
  • Picture and name fractions of a set
  • Measure using inches, feet, and centimenters
  • Compare volume, mass, and area
  • Tell time to the half hour
  • Order events by time
  • Count pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters
  • Identify and draw polygons
  • Identify geometric solids
  • Tally
  • Identify events as certain, likely, or impossible
  • Create, read, and write observations from real graphs, pictographs, and bar graphs
Science

The science curriculum at Stratford is designed to cultivate curiosity in the students about science as well as provide them with facts. Students will be taught to develop observation skills, critical thinking skills, and to learn how to integrate the scientific process.

Topics Discussed:
  • Nutrition and hygiene
  • Zoo animals and their classifications
  • Nocturnal animals
  • Plants
  • Magnets
  • Weather and the Water Cycle
  • Dental Health
  • Heart
  • Simple Machines
  • Ecology and the Rainforest
  • Insects and Spiders
Social Studies

The primary purpose of the Lower School social studies program is to help students become productive and responsible citizens. The curriculum enables students to develop the ability to make informed decisions that balance concern for the individual interests and the public good in a culturally diverse and independent world.

Knowledge, skills, and values are the three major elements that compromise the social studies curriculum. Instruction is meaningful, value-based, and challenging. Through such a process students will develop the necessary knowledge, skills, and values of a committed, competent citizen who participates in the civic affairs of the community and nation.

Components of the program:

  • Map and Globe Skills
  • Citizenship and values
  • Environmental concerns
  • Community
  • Fire Safety
  • Kids Voting
  • Presidents
  • Famous People
Spanish

First grade Spanish introduces students to vocabulary and culture. They learn simple phrases and terms, which are continually practiced and reinforced throughout the year. There is a particular emphasis on phrases, colors, and numbers.

Elements covered:
  • Songs, including Mi Cuerpo, Feliz Cumpleaños, Diez Amigos, Feliz Navidad
  • Holidays such as Día de los Muertos, Navidad en Hispanoamérica, and Cinco de Mayo
  • Games, including Simón dice
  • Basic Greetings
  • Polite Words
  • Numbers 0-20
  • Colors
  • Classroom Objects
  • Basic Foods
  • Clothing
  • Facial Features
  • Family
  • Animals
  • City Words
  • Alphabet
  • Classroom Objects
  • Simple Action Verbs
  • Clothing
  • Expressing likes/dislikes, wants/needs
  • Food
  • Alphabet
  • City Words
  • Pledge of Allegiance

Second Grade

Language Arts

Stratford’s language arts curriculum is comprised of reading, language, writing, and spelling. Reading instruction includes a balanced, developmentally appropriate approach to teaching phonemic awareness, phonics, and comprehension. Students are exposed to a variety of methods and materials. Students are taught to appreciate literature and encouraged to develop a love for reading. Every day students are read to, they are read with, or they read silently.

The second grade language arts curriculum builds on the foundation of the first grade curriculum. Phonic skills are reviewed and applied through reading and writing exercises. The students’ vocabulary is enhanced by providing challenges of new and more difficult words while reinforcing common words with practice. Comprehension skills are taught through fiction and nonfiction reading.

Communication skills such as speaking, spelling, and writing are expanded. Students are introduced to the writing process. Editing and mechanics become a part of published work. Instruction on grammar and usage provide the students with basic knowledge to make the connection between the written and spoken word.

Literature and Literary Skills:
  • Identify title and author
  • Recognize setting is the time and place of a narrative
  • Recognize the author’s use of characterization
  • Practice visualization
  • Extend experiences with literary forms and genre
  • Share the reading and discussion of books
  • Recognize personification
Comprehension Skills:
  • Select the main idea of entire passages
  • Review sequence of events
  • Review cause and effect relationships
  • Review predicting outcomes
  • Review drawing conclusions on given information and familiar experiences
  • Practice summarizing
  • Make judgments about fantasy or reality
  • Grammar Skills:
  • Recognize types of sentences
  • Recognize nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs,
Math

Math lessons are designed to incorporate multisensory teaching methods. The math program introduces new concepts at incremental stages of development. Students have continued practice and review of the concepts on a daily basis. Students use math manipulatives and are exposed to a variety of learning techniques. They also develop a solid foundation in the language and definitions of math. A daily math board is used to practice mental math, word problems, patterns, geometry, and problems on time, money, and computation. Mental math, problem solving skills, and enrichment activities are implemented on a daily basis.

Math Skills:
  • Skip count by 3’s, 4’s, 10’s, 25’s, and 100’s
  • Compare and order numbers
  • Identify ordinal position to tenth
  • Identify sorting and patterning rules
  • Solve routine and non-routine problems
  • Master all basic addition and subtraction facts
  • Identify commutative and associative properties of addition
  • Identify place value in a three-digit number
  • Master multiplication facts to 5
  • Add and subtract two-digit numbers
  • Picture and name fractions
  • Measure to the nearest half-inch, centimeter, and foot
  • Compare volume
  • Compare and measure mass
  • Measure perimeter and area
  • Tell time to five-minute intervals
  • Count pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters
  • Show change from $1.00 using mental math
  • Multiply by 0
  • Identify angles
  • Tally
  • Create, read, and write observations form real graphs, pictographs, bar graphs, Venn diagrams, and line graphs
Science

The science curriculum at Stratford is designed to cultivate curiosity in the students about science as well as provide them with facts. Students will be taught to develop observation skills, critical thinking skills, and to learn how to integrate the scientific process.

Topics Discussed:
  • Plant Life
  • Animal Life
  • Keeping Well
  • How the Earth Changes
  • Earth, Sun, and Moon
  • Energy
Social Studies

The primary purpose of the Lower School social studies program is to help students become productive and responsible citizens. The curriculum enables students to develop the ability to make informed decisions that balance concern for the individual interests and the public good in a culturally diverse and independent world.

Knowledge, skills, and values are the three major elements that compromise the social studies curriculum. Instruction is meaningful, value-based, and challenging. Through such a process students will develop the necessary knowledge, skills, and values of a committed, competent citizen who participates in the civic affairs of the community and nation.

Topics discussed:
  • Map Skills
  • Neighborhoods and how they change
  • Neighborhoods long ago
  • People, Goods, and Services
  • Rules and Laws
  • People Around the World
Spanish

Second grade Spanish builds upon the basics learned in first grade with a continuous review. Students will study many of the same topics while expanding their unit vocabulary. In second grade, the students begin speaking more Spanish as they begin to build simple descriptive sentences. They also have more classes conducted primarily in the target language. Students complete vocabulary study sheets at the beginning of each unit to take home and practice.

Elements covered:
  • Numbers 0-39
  • Parts of the Body
  • Colors
  • Family
  • Greetings
  • Animals
  • Titles
  • Household Items
  • Tú vs. Usted
  • Adjectives/Opposites
  • Days of the Week
  • Commands
  • Songs, including Mi Cuerpo, Feliz Cumpleaños, Diez Amigos, Feliz Navidad
  • Information on holidays such as Día de los Muertos, Navidad en Hispanoamerica, and Cinco de Mayo
  • Games, including unit Bingo, Calendar Game, Spanish Bee, Board Game, and
  • Simón dice
  • Various chants, including Body Chant

Third Grade

Language Arts

Stratford’s language arts curriculum is comprise of reading, language, writing, and spelling. Reading instruction includes a balanced, developmentally appropriate approach to teaching phonemic awareness, phonics, and comprehension. Students are expose to a variety of methods and materials. Students are taught to appreciate literature and encouraged to develop a love for reading. Every day students are read to, they are read with, or they read silently.

Third grade emphasizes a hands-on approach to literature. Students continue to construct meaning from printed materials by applying appropriate strategies across the curriculum. They relate oral, written, and visual material to prior knowledge and experiences to expand comprehension. Vocabulary is strengthened through reading activities and content area subjects. Students are taught to express meaning through writing sentences and short paragraphs. They implement the writing process when composing different forms of written expression.

Literature and Literary Skills:
  • Identify title and author
  • Recognize setting is the time and place of a narrative
  • Recognize the author’s use of characterization
  • Visualize events and characters
  • Compare and contrast literary forms and genre
  • Recognize theme
  • Recognize personification, simile, and idioms
Comprehension Skills:
  • Select the main idea of entire passages
  • Identify important details
  • Review sequence of events
  • Review cause and effect relationships
  • Review predicting outcomes
  • Review drawing conclusions on given information and familiar experiences
  • Recognize word meanings from context clues
  • Summarize a passage
  • Make judgments about fantasy or reality
Grammar Skills:
  • Recognize sentence types
  • Identify subject and predicate as well as simple subject and predicate
  • Recognize common, proper, singular, plural, and possessive nouns
  • Identify pronouns
  • Distinguish between action and linking verbs
  • Identify adjectives and adverbs
Math

Math lessons are designed to incorporate multisensory teaching methods. The math program introduces new concepts at incremental stages of development. Students have continued practice and review of the concepts on a daily basis. Students use math manipulatives and are exposed to a variety of learning techniques. They also develop a solid foundation in the language and definitions of math. A daily math board is used to practice mental math, word problems, patterns, geometry, and problems on time, money, and computation. Mental math, problem solving skills, and enrichment activities are implemented on a daily basis.

Math Skills:
  • Skip count by whole numbers
  • Compare and order numbers
  • Identify place value
  • Identify ordinal position to twentieth
  • Count money
  • Identify Tally marks
  • Write fact families
  • Write word problems
  • Solve routine and nonroutine problems
  • Master all multiplication and division facts
  • Add/subtract muiltidigit numbers
  • Multiply a multidigit number by single-digit
  • Graph ordered pairs on a coordinate graph
  • Add positive and negative numbers
  • Picture, name, and order fractions
  • Add and subtract fractions with common denominators
  • Measure to nearest quarter inch, millimeter
  • Compare and measure mass
  • Measure perimeter and area
  • Tell time to the minute
  • Determine elapsed time
  • Identify and complete patterns
  • Make change for a dollar using mental math
  • Identify angles
  • Identify lines of symmetry
  • Identify function rules
  • Create graphs

Science

The science program at Stratford is a blend of general science content with an emphasis on the development of basic and integrated science process skills.

Students study the following topics:
  • Chemistry: Properties of Matter
  • Vertebrate Animal Classifications
  • Landforms
  • Energy
  • Simple Machines
  • Healthy Habits
  • Human Body: Digestive System
  • Ecosystems: Pond Life, Food Chain
  • Ecology, Conservation
  • Insects and Plants
Social Studies

The primary purpose of the Lower School social studies program is to help students become productive and responsible citizens. The curriculum enables students to develop the ability to make informed decisions that balance concern for the individual interests and the public good in a culturally diverse and independent world.

Knowledge, skills, and values are the three major elements that compromise the social studies curriculum. Instruction is meaningful, value-based, and challenging. Through such a process students will develop the necessary knowledge, skills, and values of a committed, competent citizen who participates in the civic affairs of the community and nation.

Third grade completes an in-depth study of the Northeast, Central, Rocky Mountain, Southwest, and Pacific Regions. They also study people instumental in the development of these areas of our country.

Skills studied:
  • Locate Georgia and important cities on a map
  • Become aware of Georgia’s history
  • Recognize famous Georgians
  • Recognize regions of the United States
  • Become familiar with the geography of the different regions
  • Become familiar with people and occupations characteristic of different regions
  • Interpret graphs and diagrams
  • Apply map skills
Spanish

Third grade students come twice a week to Spanish. Students take home copies of new vocabulary and use these sheets to study for quizzes and complete homework assignments. All previous vocabulary is continuously reviewed and expanded. Sentence creation is practiced and developed. Third grade students must always write the date in Spanish and begin using Spanish/English dictionaries.

Elements covered:
  • Numbers 0-59 ¨ Parts of the Body/Face
  • Greetings ¨ Emotions
  • Tú vs. Usted ¨ Animals
  • Days of the Week ¨ Household Items
  • Colors ¨ Singular vs. Plural
  • Classroom Objects ¨ Family/Relationships
  • Alphabet ¨ Definite/Indefinite Articles
  • Months of the Year ¨ Adjectives/Opposites
  • Clothing ¨ Commands
  • Food ¨ Action Verbs
  • City Words ¨ Capitalization Rules
  • Masculine vs. Feminine (Nouns/Adjectives) ¨ Pledge of Allegiance

Fourth Grade

Language Arts

Stratford’s language arts curriculum is comprised of reading, language, writing, and spelling. Reading instruction includes a balanced, developmentally appropriate approach to teaching phonemic awareness, phonics, and comprehension. Students are expose to a variety of methods and materials to teach and motivate each student. Students are taught to appreciate literature and encouraged to develop a love for reading. Every day students are read to, they are read with, or they read silently.

Fourth grade also emphasizes a hands-on approach to literature. Students continue to construct meaning from printed materials by applying appropriate strategies across the curriculum. They relate oral, written, and visual material to prior knowledge and experiences to expand comprehension. Vocabulary is strengthened through reading activities and content area subjects. Students are taught to express meaning through writing sentences and short paragraphs. They implement the writing process when composing different forms of written expression.

Literature and Literary Skills:
  • Identify title and author
  • Recognize setting is the time and place of a narrative
  • Recognize the author’s use of characterization
  • Visualize events and characters
  • Compare and contrast literary forms and genre
  • Recognize theme
  • Recognize personification, simile, and idioms
Comprehension Skills:
  • Select the main idea of entire passages
  • Identify important details
  • Review sequence of events
  • Review cause and effect relationships
  • Review predicting outcomes
  • Review drawing conclusions on given information and familiar experiences
  • Recognize word meanings from context clues
  • Summarize a passage
  • Make judgments about fantasy or reality
Grammar Skills:
  • Recognize sentence types and write complete sentences
  • Identify complete subject and predicate as well as simple subject and predicate
  • Recognize common, proper, singular, plural, and possessive nouns
  • Identify pronouns
  • Distinguish between action and linking verbs
  • Identify adjectives and adverbs
  • Apply rules of capitalization and punctuation
Math

Math lessons are designed to incorporate multisensory teaching methods. The math program introduces new concepts at incremental stages of development. Students have continued practice and review of the concepts on a daily basis. Students use math manipulatives and are exposed to a variety of learning techniques. They also develop a solid foundation in the language and definitions of math. A daily math board is used to practice mental math, word problems, patterns, geometry, and problems on time, money, and computation. Mental math, problem solving skills, and enrichment activities are implemented on a daily basis.

Skills covered:
  • Read, write, compare, and order large numbers
  • Write numbers in expanded form and identify place value
  • Identify prime and composite numbers
  • Identify perfect squares and cubes, square roots, and cube roots
  • Approximate square roots
  • Identify the approximate value of pi
  • Represent numbers using Roman numerals
  • Identify function rule
  • Simplify expressions containing exponents
  • Label number lines using fractions, decimals, and positive and negative numbers
  • Master basic multiplication and division facts
  • Use mental computation
  • Add, subtract, and multiply multidigit numbers using algorithms
  • Divide a multidigit number by a single-digit number
  • Represent division remainders
  • Draw lines of symmetry and reflections
  • Identify congruent and similar polygons
  • Draw circles using a compass
  • Measure and draw angles using a protractor
  • Identify and draw right, acute, and obtuse triangles
  • Measure to the nearest millimeter or sixteenth of an inch
  • Estimate and measure distance using feet, yard, and meters
  • Use a scale on a map
  • Estimate and compare the mass of objects
  • Find the volume of a rectangular prism
  • Estimate and measure perimeter, circumference, and area
  • Read a thermometer
  • Use a perpetual calendar
  • Tell time to the second
  • Find elapsed time
  • Locate information on a table or chart
  • Create and read bar graphs, pictographs, and line graphs
  • Create and read a Venn diagram
Science
Social Studies

The primary purpose of the Lower School social studies program is to help students become productive and responsible citizens. The curriculum enables students to develop the ability to make informed decisions that balance concern for the individual interests and the public good in a culturally diverse and independent world.

Knowledge, skills, and values are the three major elements that compromise the social studies curriculum. Instruction is meaningful, value-based, and challenging. Through such a process students will develop the necessary knowledge, skills, and values of a committed, competent citizen who participates in the civic affairs of the community and nation.

Students come to appreciate the beliefs and values of the American heritage. They will also develop and understanding of the influence of geography, past events, and technological inventions, and political influences that have molded the development of our country. The fourth grade social studies curriculum covers the study of American history from the Age of Exploration to the Civil War during half of the year.

Topics studied:
  • The First Americans
  • Spanish Explorers
  • English settle America
  • French come to America
  • America’s fight for freedom
  • The birth of a new country
  • Benjamin Franklin and George Washington
  • The Constitution
  • The United States doubles in size
  • The War of 1812
  • The Industrial Revolution
  • Andrew Jackson
  • Independence for Texas
  • On to Oregon and California
  • Southern states leave
  • Beginnings of the Civil War

Fourth grade also studies the influence of the ancient western world on the United States. They explore the ancient cultures of the Middle East, Rome, and Europe.

Topics studied:
  • People of Ancient Egypt
  • People of the Fertile Crescent
  • Study of the Phoenicians, Jews, and Persians
  • Life in Ancient India and China
  • Story of Ancient Greece
  • Beginning of the Roman Empire
  • The Fall of Rome
  • Beginning of Christianity
  • Europe in the Middle Ages
  • Muslims and their empire
  • Growth of cities and trade
  • Growth of Democracy
  • The Renaissance
  • The Reformation
  • Explorers find new lands
  • Civilizations in Africa and the Americas
  • Colonies for Europe
Spanish

Fourth grade students are graded in the same fashion as their other subjects. They are evaluated on their listening comprehension, speaking ability, writing ability, and general comprehension. Fourth graders bring home vocabulary lists, complete homework assignments and projects, and have tests and quizzes. Fourth grade Spanish reviews and expands previously learned vocabulary. Grammar becomes very important as the students create more detailed sentences. They will also complete a country project, describing a Hispanic country in detail. There is vast use of Spanish/English dictionaries in the fourth grade.

Topics discussed:
  • Songs, including Feliz Cumpleaños and Feliz Navidad
  • Various articles/information on holidays such as Día de los Muertos, Navidad en Hispanoamerica, and Cinco de Mayo
  • Games, including unit Bingo, Spanish Bee, Board Game, and Simón dice
  • Numbers 0-101
  • Possessive Adjectives
  • Greetings
  • Parts of the Body/Face
  • Punctuation Marks/Accents
  • Family
  • Classroom Objects
  • Household Items
  • Creating Plurals
  • Diminutives
  • Days of the Week/Calendar Words
  • Restaurant/Food
  • Months of the Year/Seasons
  • Capitalization Rules
  • Masculine vs. Feminine Nouns
  • Holidays
  • Definite Articles
  • Weather
  • Addition/Subtraction Math Problems
  • Compass Directions
  • Expressions/Commands
  • Alphabet
  • Colors/Hair Colors
  • Pledge of Allegiance

Fifth Grade

Language Arts

Stratford’s language arts curriculum is comprised of reading. Language, writing, and spelling. An organized, in-depth vocabulary study is added in fifth grade. Students are taught to appreciate literature and encouraged to develop a love for reading. Every day students are read to, they are read with, or they read silently.

Comprehension skills are strengthened and techniques needed for critical thinking are developed. Students are encouraged to apply prior knowledge and context clues to gain an understanding of the content they are reading. Study skills are developed and applied to non-fiction and subject area reading. It is our goal to create confident, lifelong readers and learners.

Literature and Literary Skills:
  • Visualize events and characters
  • Compare and contrast literary forms and genre
  • Recognize theme
  • Recognize personification, simile, idiom, and hyperbole
Comprehension Skills:
  • Summarize main idea of passages
  • Identify and record important details
  • Recall sequence of events
  • Recognize word meanings from context clues
  • Make judgments about fantasy or reality
  • Associate reading material to prior knowledge and experiences to expand comprehension
  • Research and share ideas in all content areas
  • Select and use reference sources for a variety of purposes
  • Interact with a variety of media to extend or enhance class studies and personal experiences
Grammar skills:
  • Apply rules of capitalization and punctuation
  • Recognize common, proper, singular, plural, and possessive nouns
  • Identify pronouns
  • Distinguish between action and linking verbs
  • Identify adjectives and adverbs
  • Write various types of sentences
  • Recognize prepositions and conjunctions
Writing skills:
  • Write effectively in academic, social and personal situations
  • Express meaning through writing compound and complex sentences and paragraphs in a well-organized manner
  • Use writing process when composing various forms of written expression
  • Practice editing skills when final drafts are published
Math

Math lessons are designed to incorporate multisensory teaching methods. The math program introduces new concepts at incremental stages of development. Students have continued practice and review of the concepts on a daily basis. Students use math manipulatives and are exposed to a variety of learning techniques. They also develop a solid foundation in the language and definitions of math. A daily math board is used to practice mental math, word problems, patterns, geometry, and problems on time, money, and computation. Mental math, problem solving skills, and enrichment activities are implemented on a daily basis.

Math Skills:
  • Using money to illustrate place value
  • Addition and Subtraction Algorithms
  • Making a multiplication table
  • Multiplying three factors
  • Three ways to show division
  • Dividing with remainders
  • Halves, fourths, tenths
  • Factors
  • Parallel, intersecting, and perpendicular lines
  • Drawing angels
  • Using fraction manipulatives
  • Polygons
  • Fractions on a number line
  • Mixed numbers
  • Adding and subtracting fractions with common denominators
  • Reading lengths on a metric scale
  • Simplifying mixed numbers
  • Whole numbers in expanded notation
  • Finding information to solve problems
  • Finding averages
  • Multiplying by two-digit and three-digit numbers
  • Calculating perimeter of polygons
  • Dividing and writing quotients with fractions
  • Decimal place value through hundredths
  • Multiplying fractions
  • Prime numbers
  • Greatest common factor
  • Geometric solids
  • Converting and reducing fractions
  • Dividing by two-digit numbers
  • Reciprocals of fractions
  • Dividing fractions
  • Writing a percent as a fraction
  • Multiplying decimals
  • Least common multiple
  • Probability
  • Dividing decimals
  • Locating points on a coordinate graph
Science
Social Studies

The primary purpose of the Lower School social studies program is to help students become productive and responsible citizens. The curriculum enables students to develop the ability to make informed decisions that balance concern for the individual interests and the public good in a culturally diverse and independent world.

Knowledge, skills, and values are the three major elements that compromise the social studies curriculum. Instruction is meaningful, value-based, and challenging. Through such a process students will develop the necessary knowledge, skills, and values of a committed, competent citizen who participates in the civic affairs of the community and nation.

The fifth grade social studies curriculum focuses on the United States, its land, resources, and history.

Skills studied:
  • Our country’s land, natural resources, and climates
  • The Regions of the United States
  • The First Americans
  • North American Indians
  • The Vikings
  • The French and English come to America
  • Jamestown, Pilgrims, and settlement of the Atlantic coast
  • Geography and occupations of the New England colonies
  • Geography and people of the Middle Colonies
  • Founding of the Southern Colonies
  • Development and growth of the colonies
  • French and Indian War
  • American Revolution
  • The Constitution and a new government
  • Opening the way to the West
  • War of 1812
  • Geography and growth of the West
  • Civil War and reconstruction
  • Settling the West
  • Industrial Revolution
  • United States in the Twentieth Century
Spanish

Fifth grade students begin to fully grasp and integrate the language. They spend significant time studying verb charts and verb conjugation and learn to conjugate regular and irregular verbs as well as forming more complex sentences. Many of the concepts and activities covered are similar to those used in Spanish I in the upper school. Fifth graders complete vocabulary sheets, homework and project assignments, and have quizzes and tests. There is extensive use and dependence on the Spanish/English dictionaries. Lessons begin to truly integrate several units.

Skills studied:
  • Songs, including Feliz Cumpleaños and Feliz Navidad
  • Information on holidays such as Día de los Muertos, Navidad en Hispanoamerica, and Cinco de Mayo
  • Numbers 0-1000
  • Sizes
  • Months of the Year/Writing Dates
  • Colors
  • Expressions/Commands
  • Prepositions
  • Punctuation Marks/Accents
  • Tú vs. Usted
  • Masculine vs. Feminine Nouns
  • Pronouns
  • Singular vs. Plural Nouns
  • AR Verbs
  • Classroom Objects
  • ER Verbs
  • Definite/Indefinite Articles
  • IR Verbs
  • Adding/Subtracting/Multiplying/Dividing
  • Ser vs. Estar
  • Professions
  • Tener
  • Possessive Adjectives
  • Adjective Agreement
  • Clothing
  • Household Items
  • Adjectives/Opposites
  • Restaurant
  • Telling Time
  • Grocery Store
  • Sports
  • Food
  • Shapes
  • Transportation